Friday, November 19, 2010

Harry Potter 7 ( and The Deathly Hallows ) Part 1, film reviews


  Based on the popular series of international best seller novel delivered by J.K.Rowling ( I like your name), Harry Potter and The Deathly Hallows or widely known as Harry Potter 7 differ from its earlier installments of the series. Before I continue, I would like to stress it out that this review were not only written upon its film-based plot, but also to be compare with the original book of Harry Potter and The Deathly Hallows it self. I have been a die-hard-fans of harry potter (movie + books) ever since the beginning of the stories and I have read, re-read, and re-re-read the whole books for more than 14 times ( lost count ). I believe that if there's any examination regarding Harry Potter, I'll definitely get A++ for it.
 Trust No One

  Alright lets get onto the review, as I said, The latest "Harry Potter" movie covers only half of the book it's featured. And Thank God, I'm grateful that this time David Yates gave his best to produce every detail, every single thing from the book into this films. In my opinion, this is the best way to get the "new" audience, those who never read or watch any of Harry Potter series before, to understand the core, plots and every nook and crook within the story in a fundamental and interesting yet twisted way. Over the time, the three young actors has been perfected their acting skills and this time, their performance; Daniel Radcliffe, Emma Watson, and Rupert were astounding in which every parts of the emotion in every scene they've shown in the movies , were truly Alive! ( thanks to the decades of acting experience in Harry Potter Movies ). 
 Outing in a Muggle world

  Here's a snippet/synopsis of what happen in the first part of Harry Potter 7, in case any of you plan to watch movies with your friends or your love one this weekend. If you looking of romance, I say yes there is, just a portion of the whole movie yet still gave us (the audience) "ohhh" and "ahhh" especially there's a scene where ***** kissing *_____* in such a daring ways, Oh my God.. hahaha.. apart from that, several other actors and actress were also perform well and for this I give credits to the Bonnie Wright who played Ginny Weasly, I believe this young actress can go further if given a more challenging role in future. the same goes to other actors who played nevile, dean, seamus and etc.. you've all done well in making this movie franchise to become successful over the decades. 
One of the most lovely kissing scene I've ever see

 I've search through Internet to look for specific and extraordinary reviews on this Movie and here some of the best i've found;


Unlike earlier installments of the series, the newest "Harry Potter" film covers only half of J.K. Rowling's featured book. Somewhere during this movie version's vast and lumbering middle section - in which a harried Harry, Hermione and Ron trudge through what seems an aimless "Lonely Planet"-inspired budget journey through the gorgeous British countryside - I thought of the "half again" infinity parodox. To reach a destination, first you must travel half the distance, then half again that distance (which is really a quarter of the total distance), and so on, until you stretch out to infinity.
A sudden chill struck, as if a squad of Snatchers had just crept up behind me, and an irrational fear took hold: What if the same thing happens with the "Harry Potter" franchise? If this outing only covers half the last book, then what if the next one only covers half that remaining material, and the next one half again as much, and so on, until we're caught in an infinite chain of multiplex madness?
What if the series never ends?
I'm speaking as someone who hasn't read the books but has faithfully seen (and generally liked) each of the earlier movies, and it comes down to this: Even though I knew what I was getting into with this "half" book outing, I was really, really ready for Harry to wrap things up.
Before I'm pummeled by an angry mob armed with plastic wands purchased from the Harry Potter theme park, let me hasten to explain I'm fully aware of the reasons why "Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows" had to be broken into two parts. There's the sheer size of the book, most importantly, and the complexity of the story, and the significant social issues raised, and the huge number of characters, and all those loose ends to tie up. Yes, yes, I understand that this "Part 1" is merely a set-up for what promises to be a rip-roaring finale.
But that didn't stop me from being a little bored at how bleak and mopy the whole thing is, especially in the middle.
"Part 1" is a somber and menacing outing, as befits the grim "end of times" scenario posed with uber-villain (and curiously nostril-impaired) Lord Voldemort consolidating his grip on both the magical and Muggle worlds. Chief on his list of things to do is get rid of Harry Potter. Director David Yates and cinematographer Eduardo Serra wield a dark and shadowy palette that gives the film the look of a tromp through a poorly lighted cave.
Against this backdrop, the much-hunted Harry (played by an increasingly nondescript Daniel Radcliffe, whose earnest gravitas is starting to give him the air of a 20-year-old going on 45) realizes he has to stop endangering the extended group of friends protecting him.
With Hermione (a pert but limited Emma Watson, who has not blossomed into as fine a teen-age actress as I suspect producers would have wished) and Ron (the amiable but likewise just-a-little-out-of-his-element Rupert Grint - let's face it, these aren't just cute little kids anymore but big-screen adult actors required to chew on jawbreaker-sized chunks of tragic introspection), Harry sets out on a lonely quest to track down the crucial horcruxes he needs to destroy to kill Voldemort (Ralph Fiennes, as delightfully malevolent as ever).
For book and movie fans alike, there are lots of lovely visuals that come to life to reinforce Rowling's detailed prose - from a neat spell in which Harry's friends assume his form to foil his pursuers to a fantastic magical bag belonging to Hermione that contains more luggage than your sister-in-law tried to take on her 28-day Caribbean cruise.
I especially love the giant tent the three friends set up in the vast scenic landscapes that looks tiny on the outside but inside is big enough to hold a racquetball court. An extended animated sequence explaining the origin of the movie's title is a stunning addition to the "Potter" visual legacy.
For all the zippy effects, however, much of the first part of "Deadly Hollows" relies on a thorough familiarity with the Potter canon in order to maintain a strong narrative flow in the movie. Without immersion in the "holy book," sections of the film seem to just hang there.
Plus, the weight of all that teen-age angst can be oppressive. (From talking afterward with a book lover, it turns out there's not really a love triangle between Harry, Hermione and Ron, which is what an odd dance scene seems to convey.)
Adding to the grimness is the larger context of disturbing events in the magical (and Muggle) world at large, complete with police-state despotism.
And even when the storyline picks up momentum after the trio's extended wanderings, director Yates has to work in what I consider to be a ham-fisted Rowling-mandated plot intervention involving the popular house elf Dobby.
All the loose ends will be wrapped up in the second part of "Deadly Hollows," of course, which is due in July. Though I joke about the movie series going on forever, I do realize the end is near. (I might not have read these books, but I've absorbed a certain amount of the pop-culture zeitgeist surrounding the series, and I understand why Harry might want to stretch things out as long as he can.) I'll believe it when I see it.


  Personally, I'm agree of what has been mention on several parts of this authors review, what will happen if the story never end? as for me, it'll be a great Joy but hey, whenever there's a start, there will be an end. so bear with it. but I object on what the authors said about Emma, she's already grown into a fine and charismatic woman in her own way. 10 Years ago when the first Harry Potter films on aired, The only person who will strike fortune and popularity apart from the Movie star, Harry Potter (Daniel Radcliffe) is Emma, I said to my self that this young actress is a prodigy and she'll become more compare to Daniel and Rupert in future, and yes, 10 years later, she has prove what I've believe a long time ago.
Even Darth Vader enjoy reading Harry Potter, How bout' you?

According to Yahoo news, ( by Mike Collet), Harry a.k.a Daniel had given an exclusive interview on what he think about the latest installments. let's hear what Daniel said shall we?

By Mike Collett-White
LONDON - Daniel Radcliffe, 21, has spent nearly half his life as a movie star since he was first cast as Harry Potter a decade ago.
The Briton is now a multi-millionaire and famous the world over after the eight-movie series turned into one of the biggest film franchises in cinema history.
The Warner Bros. studio decided to make two films out of author J.K. Rowling's seventh and final Harry Potter Book "Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows." Part 1 comes out on Friday and Part 2, in 3-D, will hit theatres in July, 2011.
Now shooting has ended on the series, Radcliffe is looking ahead to life beyond the wizarding world. He sat down with Reuters recently to talk about Deathly Hallows Part 1 and what is in store for him next.
Q: So, to get this one out of the way, you were quoted as saying recently that Emma Watson was "a bit of an animal" in your kissing scene together. What did she have to say about that?
A: "When you're in this period of time when you do an interview and it's aired the next day, your quotes come back at you so quickly. On and said 'What have you been saying to people about me?'."
Q: Some people found the sixth Harry Potter film more straightforward. Would you agree?
A: "I loved five, but six is a hard film to make. Even though I think it's the most beautiful of all the films so far, it's also a really hard film to make because it is basically just a colossal amount of exposition that sets up number seven.
"It is a tougher one to make accessible to everybody who hasn't read the books, because you are just cramming in a huge amount of information."
Q: Deathly Hallows Part 1 also seems slower-paced than some other Potter movies.
"In ... this is so sedate compared to what the next one is going to be like. The next film, because you've had all the plot set up already, you can just kind of enjoy the insanity of all the action."
Q: Rupert Grint as a war movie. Would you go that far?
A: "They've all stolen my line! My pitch the other day. Damn it!
"The last movie is going to be really, really fast-paced and a load of action in it and it is like a war film. If we had done this book in one film, the stuff that would have got cut is most of this film.
"For me that is the most interesting part of the story, because it's where the characters develop and change.
"This film, despite the silence and slower pacing ... was the most chaotic to work on by quite a long way. It was mad. We all felt the pressure on this film to make it the best, because it's the last.
"Suddenly somebody might wake up one morning and go 'Oh I'm not sure about how my character is in this scene' or the writer would have an idea so we'd be getting re-writes for some scenes the day before they were shot. It was constantly moving and had a less settled feel than the other ones had had."
Q: After 10 years living with the Potter phenomenon, how did it feel at the end of the final scene of shooting?
A: "There was just some very primal reaction. When you've spent 10 years in a certain place with a group of people, suddenly that goes ... you do sort of go 'What am I going to do now?' It was bizarre, because I knew I was doing a musical next year but that was all done, I knew that was going to happen, and I knew there was a definite option of one of about three films ... but at that moment I was really thinking ... 'What am I going to without all of you?' because it was those people I had learned so much from.
"That was, I think, the main feeling of slight bereavement, but then four hours later I was on a plane going to New York where I was doing the Tony Awards the next day, presenting, and I was reading the script for 'The Woman in Black' and five months down the line I'm half way through shooting it, so we move on."
Q: Do you ever envisage a day when you may not have writers and directors falling over themselves to cast you?
A: "As my dad always says, whenever I'm looking at other scripts and not knowing which one's going to work out, 'Oh happy problem!'. At the moment ... it's an embarrassment of riches and it comes back to a quote that you often hear people in sports talk about which is: 'form is temporary, class is permanent.'
"That's what I want to use the next few years to develop myself as -- into somebody who everybody knows wants to be around for a long time and I'm going to do that hopefully through choosing very classy projects like The Woman in Black. - Source (yahoo news)



That's all from me;
Deideian
http://www.deideian.com/

2 comments for this post:

SaRaSoTa JoSepT said...

Hai kaban... dah ku meda. kemari. hihi... dah enda tentu ingat ku cerita dalam book ia. book ia tinggal di rumah... ila tua share ba dini perbezaan cerita dalam buku n film ia. have a nice day:)

Deideian said...

Sara.. dah nuan meda? hehe.. first part agak "berat" sikit la segal semua persoalan ari siri 1 suba sampai movie ke-enam start terjawab.. ila part 2, nyak baru iya.. diak bala cdak David Yates ngau J.K.Rowling ngasak amai amai haha..

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ah~ comment if you like this post, i would like to read your respond in order to create more exciting topics in future ehe...^^

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